The Ledges of Grand Ledge
 
Grand Ledge, Michigan
 

 

 

Our unique [grand] ledges that appear for approximately one mile in the Grand Ledge area, are ancient sedimentary rocks lining the shores of the Grand River. It is the largest outcropping of rocks in Central Michigan, and the seventh largest in the state. Based on the evidence of, and in, these layers of sandstone, it is believed that 300 million years ago Grand Ledge was a salt water sea.  The rocks found in the area contain fossils some of which can only be found here.  From more recent times, the stones are stained with iron traces and at one time coal was mined along the river banks.  Veins of coal can still be found along the river path which begins near the entrance to Island Park and ends at Fitzgerald Park.  At Oak Park rock climbers practice and learn their skills.

 

 
 

 Indian tribes, led by Chief Okemos, migrated through this area each year looking for game and tapping the trees for maple syrup.

To the Indians, the Grand Ledge area was known as Big Rocks.

   
 

 

 

 Caves once riddled the area giving rise to many legends. Known as Robbers Caves or Counterfeiters Caves, it is said they were used to stable stolen horses awaiting sale. Another story claims the caves were used to harbor fugitive slaves.

 

 

 

Sediments (sand, silt and clay) were carried by the water (270 million years ago) and deposited in layers along river banks and beaches. Time and pressure compacted and cemented such sediments into the rocks you see today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For me the ledges are nice places to spend some quiet time.  I enjoy walking the trails, or passing by in a canoe. Maybe simply pausing to contemplate, or finding a spot for meditation.  I am amazed sometimes at the variety of colors, and the tenacity of life pushing up through the ledges.  Occasionally I bring my camera.  Some years ago I simply categorized the photos I took there as "The Ledges."  Later, I started separating them according to the location, or some other criteria, as the files grew.  What you see here are early shots from "The Ledges" file.  There are 69 more photos on the second page. Eventually I will add additional pages for each of the parks, Fitzgerald, Oak, and Lincoln Brick, as well as "Climbing the Ledges," and "The Ledges in Winter."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Ledges Pages

69 photos

Artwork & Carvings

Climbers

Oak Park

Lincoln Brick Park

In Winter

Fitzgerald Park

 

 

 

 
 
 
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